I’ve been writing blog posts about the Alexander Technique and not publishing them for several years now. I’m not a natural writer. I work at it. I do get lots of ideas for blog posts; things that I’d like to share with my students and anyone else who might find their way to me. These ideas, once written down, tend to languish in a state of incompleteness and continual revision. Making little tweaks, (changing a phrase here or there and then deciding to look at it later, only to change it again), has kept me satisfied that I’m moving forward. This isn’t necessarily bad. I’ve written and edited a lot, even for this post and I’m still learning (I played the violin for many years, so I believe in practice!). The problem is that, despite all the revisions, I never feel any closer to being ready. I’m not really sure what being ready will feel like, but publishing equals visibility and visibility feels a little uncomfortable.

Recently, I decided to take the leap and actually start publishing my blog. It’s time. The balance tipped away from needing to feel comfortable and sure, toward wanting to communicate about my work. Though the Alexander Technique is experiential, and defies description in some ways, I think writing and discussion can enhance the experience and offer a framework for understanding it. My hope is that this blog will be a resource for those who have had lessons as well as for those who might be new to the work and interested in its applications in daily life.

The Alexander Technique is, among other things, about paying attention to how we do what we do. Part of the creative process is uncertainty, but we all have a lot of choice in how we respond to that. I don’t have to completely believe in the feeling of unreadiness at this point. I can’t necessarily make it go away, but I can respond differently to it. Attention to “the means whereby”, (to quote F.M. Alexander), can help us see more clearly where we are, solve problems as we progress, recognize new possibilities, and explore new creative territory. I might still worry that I’ll run out of things to say, or that I’ll turn out to be a terrible writer, not just a reluctant one. It’s just as possible that I could find this practice to be rewarding and fun! Anyway, I just think it’s time to start. Taking this step in the direction of being more visible means gently quieting the reactive, if well-meaning, voice that tells me I’ll eventually be more comfortable if I wait. I’m not sure that’s true. I think I might eventually be more comfortable if I start.

So, here goes…

Blog posted. Leap taken!

I welcome your comments about anything I write, and would love to hear suggestions for things you’d like to read about. If you liked this post, please stay tuned for my next installment!

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